The Big Six Bootcamp

Frequently Asked Questions

Brian has been developing the Big Six for decades and has implemented it at multiple companies with great success. Truth is, Brian didn’t invent any of this. He simply curated a key set of essential business practices and placed them in a powerful (do the right things right) framework. Every practice he’s included is being used not only by his clients but by almost every large company. That said, not every company uses each practice fully and that’s where the opportunity is. If you install some you’ll have an easier time of scaling your business. If you install them all fully you’ll find yourself way out ahead of most other companies. And it’s easy. .

You can cancel and receive a full refund up to 4 weeks after the start of the Bootcamp. If something serious comes up after that time, give us a call and we’ll see what we can do. We’d be happy to reschedule you for another bootcamp.

Yes, you can receive a full refund for any product or program at any time.

If you are able to attend three 90-minute meetings a week plus a few hours to do your implementation work you’ll have no trouble keeping up. And don’t worry if you fall a little bit behind. All sessions are recorded so that you can catch up later.

Every participant signs an NDA and you don’t have to share anything you don’t want to .

We don’t allow direct competitors in the same class. If there is even a remote chance two members are competitors we discuss the situation with each member beforehand and do what is right.

We use Zoom for all our on-line meetings. We recommend you participate in the video mode but if you can’t, there are phone lines to call in. Zoom instructions will be sent to you when you register for the bootcamp and you’ll be sent reminders so you will be fully prepared when the meetings begin.

This is easy! Look around our website or take our questionnaire. If you discover that you don’t have many or any of the fundamentals in place, then this course is for you. But you are also welcome to contact me for a 15 minute, introductory call. Nothing salesy. We look forward to answering your questions and seeing how we can help you.

When you’ve completed the course you have several options. You can remain in a CEO (or C-level) roundtable or take advantage of individual coaching. You can also join the CEO Mastery Community for $49/mo. and get access to free workshops, and open Q&A sessions with Brian.

No problem, we’re here to help. You can set up a call or use the chat function on our site to get your question addressed immediately.

Wednesdays of the course are dedicated to implementing the work you’re learning about on Mondays. So your implementation group is literally a group of your peers, led by Brian, discussing how you’re getting along and addressing any obstacles in your way so you can get it done. Brian and your peers will be helping you brainstorm solutions to any problems and offering up their own successes. You get a ton of people’s expertise all at your fingertips.

They’re also a time for questions and clarification on what you learned earlier.

Ultimately, they are sessions where you have more time to go over the material with Brian and make sure you understand what he’s taught, how you’re going to implement everything and get help if you are feeling stuck.

We’ve received many inquiries about offering individual pillar classes.  If you’re interested, please sign up here to let us know and indicate the course(s) that interest you.  We’ll start with the most popular selections and notify you when your selections are available.

Click here for more information

Big Six Bootcamp Effects

Before Joining The Big Six Bootcamp​

You wake up a few minutes before the alarm goes off. It’s Monday. You feel rested and you think back briefly to the great weekend you spent at the beach with your family. But now you’re eager to get to the office and begin the week.

On the drive in you reflect on your great team and how grateful you are that everyone is so professional and positive. It feels good.

Your sales meeting on Friday was exciting. The new campaign is off to a strong start. Your sales dashboard tells you that you’re ahead of plan in both volume and margin. The best part is that you feel confident that you’re targeting the right market with the right solution and the right message. Prospects see the value and are eager to buy. You’re confident sales will continue to grow and margins will stay healthy. It’s going to be a great year.

You get to the office 30 minutes before your Monday 9:30 weekly finance meeting. You check in with people to see how they’re feeling, find out what they did over the weekend, catch up on what’s happening in their personal lives.

At 9:30 you meet with your Controller. You love this weekly cash projection review because it makes you feel so much more in control. You know that in the next two weeks, the company has to pay for extra product you purchased for a big project and a big payment is due on the upgraded IT system. It feels good to have visibility on what’s coming down the pike so you can plan accordingly.

The Controller updates you on a few other topics. For example, over the past 6 weeks the Accounts Receivable manager has reduced average days from 45 to 40 and this week they’re down to 39! You know they’re excited and proud of their accomplishments. So are you.

After the meeting you check your emails. You don’t have a tsunami of messages, like you did in the “old days”. Thank goodness! One thing that helped is that you’re not involved in everything that’s happening and you’re not being copied on every email. Your people are more capable, the managers work well together, direction and standards are clear to all and the CYA culture is gone. You’re relieved.

One of the emails is from a key customer who wants to share with you how they’ve been bragging about your company to other divisions at their company. That’s what you like to hear! You’ll share the message with the team at your weekly sales dashboard review meeting. One email is from your HR department that has 3 exciting candidates who appear to fit all the criteria of culture, skill and experience for the operations manager job you have open. You’re expanding your business and want to promote the current operations manager to operations VP with a broader scope. This is an important hire and you feel confident you’ll get the right person.

After reviewing the online project plans for the various “Working On the Business” strategic and operational initiatives that are in motion, you go to lunch with one of your direct reports. This is her monthly coaching check-in where you and she review her progress and plans to continue improving. These sessions are much more fun and productive than the “scary” old annual reviews. People seem to be growing faster and morale is higher since you began the process.

You’re also looking forward to tomorrow’s weekly Flash meeting where your team comes together to review key indicators across the organization. The numbers are filled in on Monday and the group assembles on Tuesday.

The Flash meeting has increased visibility, accountability, collaboration and team spirit. Everyone arrives on time and many people arrive a little early to chat and talk informally. They’re a close team and they like to be together. Each department head walks through the status of each of their key indicators and highlights challenges, victories and plans going forward. Then all the in-house initiatives (special projects) are reported on and the week’s priorities are highlighted. Finally, everyone reports on any process improvements their department has made or are working on. No improvement is too small to be celebrated.

After the Flash meeting there’s a Sales and Operations (S&OP) coordination meeting. Sometimes you attend but mostly you don’t because you know they have it handled. The great thing about this meeting is that there are excellent reports to support the discussion and allow for fact-based conversations and decisions. Also because of the meeting, the departments are much more collaborative and most problems get resolved before they become a crisis.

Later this week you’re off to Chicago to call on a key account and then to Atlanta to help sales pitch a new project. While you’re there you’ll be visiting with a company that is proposing an exciting joint venture in Mexico. You’re looking forward to that. And, you know that while you’re away things will be handled and you won’t be getting a bunch of emergency calls nor will there be a long line of people waiting to see you when you get back to the office.

When you reflect on how your company is doing and on your own quality of life you feel grateful for the effort you made to upgrade your management p. It took some work and required a few difficult decisions but it feels like, in no time at all, you and your team began seeing and feeling the improvements. But mostly you feel like you and your company are under control. Your company is operating smoothly, it’s growing, and you’re no longer doing a ton of delegatable work and putting out fires. You’re even going on a 2-week vacation to Maui and feeling confident that your team will handle it all while you’re away. This is good!

Big Six Bootcamp Effects

After Joining The Big Six Bootcamp

You wake up a few minutes before the alarm goes off. It’s Monday. You feel rested and you think back briefly to the great weekend you spent at the beach with your family. But now you’re eager to get to the office and begin the week.

On the drive in you reflect on your great team and how grateful you are that everyone is so professional and positive. It feels good.

Your sales meeting on Friday was exciting. The new campaign is off to a strong start. Your sales dashboard tells you that you’re ahead of plan in both volume and margin. The best part is that you feel confident that you’re targeting the right market with the right solution and the right message. Prospects see the value and are eager to buy. You’re confident sales will continue to grow and margins will stay healthy. It’s going to be a great year.

You get to the office 30 minutes before your Monday 9:30 weekly finance meeting. You check in with people to see how they’re feeling, find out what they did over the weekend, catch up on what’s happening in their personal lives.

At 9:30 you meet with your Controller. You love this weekly cash projection review because it makes you feel so much more in control. You know that in the next two weeks, the company has to pay for extra product you purchased for a big project and a big payment is due on the upgraded IT system. It feels good to have visibility on what’s coming down the pike so you can plan accordingly.

The Controller updates you on a few other topics. For example, over the past 6 weeks the Accounts Receivable manager has reduced average days from 45 to 40 and this week they’re down to 39! You know they’re excited and proud of their accomplishments. So are you.

After the meeting you check your emails. You don’t have a tsunami of messages, like you did in the “old days”. Thank goodness! One thing that helped is that you’re not involved in everything that’s happening and you’re not being copied on every email. Your people are more capable, the managers work well together, direction and standards are clear to all and the CYA culture is gone. You’re relieved.

One of the emails is from a key customer who wants to share with you how they’ve been bragging about your company to other divisions at their company. That’s what you like to hear! You’ll share the message with the team at your weekly sales dashboard review meeting. One email is from your HR department that has 3 exciting candidates who appear to fit all the criteria of culture, skill and experience for the operations manager job you have open. You’re expanding your business and want to promote the current operations manager to operations VP with a broader scope. This is an important hire and you feel confident you’ll get the right person.

After reviewing the online project plans for the various “Working On the Business” strategic and operational initiatives that are in motion, you go to lunch with one of your direct reports. This is her monthly coaching check-in where you and she review her progress and plans to continue improving. These sessions are much more fun and productive than the “scary” old annual reviews. People seem to be growing faster and morale is higher since you began the process.

You’re also looking forward to tomorrow’s weekly Flash meeting where your team comes together to review key indicators across the organization. The numbers are filled in on Monday and the group assembles on Tuesday.

The Flash meeting has increased visibility, accountability, collaboration and team spirit. Everyone arrives on time and many people arrive a little early to chat and talk informally. They’re a close team and they like to be together. Each department head walks through the status of each of their key indicators and highlights challenges, victories and plans going forward. Then all the in-house initiatives (special projects) are reported on and the week’s priorities are highlighted. Finally, everyone reports on any process improvements their department has made or are working on. No improvement is too small to be celebrated.

After the Flash meeting there’s a Sales and Operations (S&OP) coordination meeting. Sometimes you attend but mostly you don’t because you know they have it handled. The great thing about this meeting is that there are excellent reports to support the discussion and allow for fact-based conversations and decisions. Also because of the meeting, the departments are much more collaborative and most problems get resolved before they become a crisis.

Later this week you’re off to Chicago to call on a key account and then to Atlanta to help sales pitch a new project. While you’re there you’ll be visiting with a company that is proposing an exciting joint venture in Mexico. You’re looking forward to that. And, you know that while you’re away things will be handled and you won’t be getting a bunch of emergency calls nor will there be a long line of people waiting to see you when you get back to the office.

When you reflect on how your company is doing and on your own quality of life you feel grateful for the effort you made to upgrade your management p. It took some work and required a few difficult decisions but it feels like, in no time at all, you and your team began seeing and feeling the improvements. But mostly you feel like you and your company are under control. Your company is operating smoothly, it’s growing, and you’re no longer doing a ton of delegatable work and putting out fires. You’re even going on a 2-week vacation to Maui and feeling confident that your team will handle it all while you’re away. This is good!